Boiledbeans

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February 16, 2011

Mickey-mouse organizations.

srikanth @ 11:59 pm, GMT +0000 ( 1297900785 ) Play

This question is multiple “firsts” for Boiledbeans, I think.

What’s the story behind these two sets of images?

Cracked by Raghuvansh , Ananth , Logik , jowens , Rogi , shrik , Mikey , Bharath , KK , vinayaknp , Goyal , Sumanth Patlolla , Ashish , krudebox , Siddarth Pai , Rahulk , Thejas V R , rohanquizzer , lanu , jins , Riyaz Usman , raklodramA , Manish Achuth , udupendra , Sandesh , dineshk , teju , Appu S , Martin Antony and Dibyo

Answer:

Quoting Dibyo,

“This is a case of BASF’s Karl Kroyer’s patent – of using polystyrene foam balls to float a sunken vessel in Kuwait harbour – being rejected because of ‘prior art’ – namely the Donald Duck strip Sunken Yacht shown above”


31 Responses to “Mickey-mouse organizations.”

  1. Raghuvansh
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    Can’t see the second image for some reason but I think I saw this on Cracked.com – real patents that were rejected because Disney’s duck comics thought of them first, or something.


  2. Ananth
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    Donald Duck Prior Art Case
    Karl Krøyer came up with a solution to raise sunken ship by pumping buoyant bodies into it and also applied for a patent.

    In The Sunken Yacht, Donald Duck and nephews raise a ship using the same technique. So, the story could be used as prior art against the patent.


  3. Logik
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    WikiFlick.
    A 1949 Donald Duck ten-pager features Donald raising a yacht from the ocean floor by filling it with ping pong balls.
    In December 1965 Karl Krøyer, a Dane, lifted the sunken freight vessel Al Kuwait in the Kuwait Harbor by filling the hull with 27 million tiny inflatable balls of polystyrene.
    Although the suggestion is often made, Krøyer denies having been inspired by this Barks story. Some sources claim Krøyer was denied a Dutch patent registration (application number NL 6514306) for his invention on the grounds that the Barks story was a prior publication of the invention. However no definite proof of this story is available.

    ———-
    guessing the boiledbeans firsts.
    1. first question to be sourced from cracked.


  4. jowens
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    “How do you quickly raise a sunken ship full of sheep? The Danish inventor Karl Krøyer came up with a very creative solution: pump buoyant bodies into the ship to achieve sufficient upward lift to bring the ship back to the surface. The solution was so creative he got a patent on it. In a 1949 Donald Duck story, titled The Sunken Yacht a ship is raised by stuffing it full of ping-pong balls. That kind of prior art could kill the patent. But whether the story was actually used by a patent office to refuse the patent (application) remains unclear.”


  5. Rogi
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    Lifting a sunken ship by filling it with buoyant objects. Donald Duck’s idea was to use ping pong balls Which worked for the Mythbusters in shallow water but wasn’t viable in deeper waters as demonstrated in the ’70s by the Cousteau team. (The balls implode.) Karl Kroyer applied for a patent and was denied due to “prior art” (The Donald Duck cartoon.
    So, if I create a cartoon about nuclear fusion, I could clean up!


  6. shrik
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    Karl Kroyer and the “Donald Duck as prior art” case.


  7. Mikey

    A man was denied a patent on a method of raising a sunken ship by filling it full of inflated balls because of “Prior Art” – the idea was first drawn in the Donald Duck comic.


  8. Bharath
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    A 1949 Donald Duck ten-pager features Donald raising a yacht from the ocean floor by filling it with ping pong balls. In December 1965 Karl Kroyer, a Dane, lifted the sunken freight vessel Al Kuwait in the Kuwait Harbor by filling the hull with 27 million tiny inflatable balls of polystyrene. Although the suggestion is often made, Kroyer denies having been inspired by Carl Barks(creator of scrooge mcduck) story. Some sources claim Krøyer was denied a Dutch patent registration for his invention on the grounds that the Barks story was a prior publication of the invention.


  9. KK
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    1. The Sunken Yacht, a 1949 Donald Duck story
    2. Danish inventor Karl Krøyer and his famous invention of a system for raising sunken vessels using small balls of foam
    -The Sunken Yacht used the same technique to lift the ship.


  10. vinayaknp

    1. Donald Duck story being used as prior art against a patent on a method of raising a sunken ship. The Sunken Yacht a ship is raised by stuffing it full of ping-pong balls

    2. Karl Krøyer came up with a patent for the same.

    3. Used in Kuwait in 1964.


  11. Goyal
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    Karl Kroyer (in 2) applied for a patent (NL 6514306) on how to raise a sunken ship in the Dutch patent office, which was rejected using the Donald Duck story (The Sunken Yatch) as a prior art (invention known in public before the inventor’s application date).


  12. Sumanth Patlolla
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    In 1949 the Donald Duck story The Sunken Yacht (by Carl Barks) shows Donald and the nephews raising a ship by filling it with ping pong balls shoved through a tube.

    On September 14, 1964, the freighter Al Kuwait capsized at the docks in Kuwait’s harbour.On September 14, 1964, the freighter Al Kuwait capsized at the docks in Kuwait’s harbour.

    Inventor Karl Krøyer received patents for this method in the United Kingdom (GB 1070600) and Germany (DE1247893).


  13. Sumanth Patlolla
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    In 1949 the Donald Duck story The Sunken Yacht (by Carl Barks) shows Donald and the nephews raising a ship by filling it with ping pong balls shoved through a tube.

    On September 14, 1964, the freighter Al Kuwait capsized at the docks in Kuwait’s harbour.The Danish inventor Karl Krøyer came up with a method of raising this sunken ship by filling it with buoyant bodies fed through a tube.

    Inventor Karl Krøyer received patents for this method in the United Kingdom (GB 1070600) and Germany (DE1247893).


  14. Ashish

    How to upturn a sinking ship…


  15. krudebox
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    Danish engineer Karl Kroyer, devised a method of raising sunken ships off the ocean floor by pumping buoyant items into them. This was used in 1964 to lift a sunken ship in Kuwait.
    Kroyer tried to get this idea patented but was rejected probably because of the same idea being used in a 1949 Donald Duck comic called the ‘The Sunken Yacht’.


  16. The Sunken Yacht story by Carl Banks
    Pic 1 shows the story, and the method used by karl kroyer, after the story was published, to raise a ship filled with sheep from a kuwait harbour using foam balls.
    In the story, they use ping pong balls.
    ic 2 is karl kroyer himself


  17. Rahulk
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    1. The Sunken Yatch — A story involving in raising a ship by filling it with ping pong balls shoved through a tube (till it becomes buoyant) by Uncle Scrooge and his three nephews published in 1949

    2. The freighter Al Kuwait being hauled by a similar method in (1) in 1964

    Image – Danish inventor Karl Krøyer who applied for patent as he ‘invented” this method of rescuing ships. However the patent was refused due to (1) proving as prior art.


  18. 1. 1949 Donald Duck cartoon ‘The Sunken Yacht’ portrayed a method of raising a sunken ship using ping pong balls as buoyant objects.
    2. In 1964, Karl Kroeyer came up with the same solution to raise a Kuwaiti ship ‘Al Kuwait’ from the bottom of the sea.

    Kroeyer received a patent for this in the UK and Germany but the Dutch were clever. They found the 1949 Donald Duck strip and used it as a ‘prior art’ against Kroeyer’s patent application.


  19. In the donald duck comic, a method of raising a sunken ship was shown.
    The inventor Karl Kroeyer used a similar method and patented it but the patent application was rejected citing that the method was already in Donald Duck comic.


  20. lanu
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    This is about a Donald Duck story being used as prior art against a patent on a method of raising a sunken ship (by Danish inventor Karl Krøyer ). The technique was to pump buoyant bodies into the ship to achieve sufficient upward lift to bring the ship back to the surface. In a Donald Duck story, titled The Sunken Yacht a ship is raised by stuffing it full of ping-pong balls.


  21. jins

    The last image is Karl Krayer. He invented a way of raising sunken ships by the insertion of plastic balls filled with polystyrene foam. He famously demonstrated the method on a freighter in Kuwait in 1964 (2.b).
    2.a is his patent for the method

    1 is a 1949 Donald duck comic issue where Uncle Scrooge’s nephews raise his sunken yacht by filling it with ping pong balls.

    Krayer’s patent was denied since a patent has to be a novel idea, and the same idea had been used several years before, in print.

    Height of boredom – that I actually remember all of this vividly.


  22. Set 2:
    Image 1 – The patent description of bringing up a sunk ship by pumping buoyant bodies into the ship to achieve sufficient upward lift to bring the ship back to the surface.
    Image 2 – A freighter at Kuwait was lifted using the technique
    Image 3 – Inventor Karl Krøyer

    Set 1: The donald duck cartoon published in 1940’s was considered a prior art for the patent, wherein the same method is depicted much before the cartoon is published.


  23. The Danish inventor Karl Krøyer came up with a very creative solution: pump buoyant bodies into the ship to achieve sufficient upward lift to bring the ship back to the surface. The solution was so creative he got a patent on it. In a 1949 Donald Duck story, titled The Sunken Yacht a ship is raised by stuffing it full of ping-pong balls.

    Donald Duck story being used as prior art against a patent on a method of raising a sunken ship. A 1949 Donald Duck story used the same technique.

    The invention has been used in 1964 in Kuwait. On September 14, 1964, the freighter Al Kuwait capsized at the docks in Kuwait’s harbour.


  24. Manish Achuth
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    Donald Duck story The Sunken Yacht talks about a problem – how to raise a sunken ship. They used ping pong balls.
    Karl Kroyer submitted the patent for the same using bouyant bodies fed through a tube.
    The most famous one, shown in the photograph, was in 1964 in Kuwait. On September 14, 1964, the freighter Al Kuwait capsized at the docks in Kuwait’s harbour. The ship was carrying 5,000 sheep that started decomposing in the harbour’s water. Since this threatened to contaminate the city of Kuwait’s drinking water supply, the ship had to be raised as quickly as possible. Bringing in cranes would have taken too long, and with such methods there is a significant risk that the ship will break.


  25. udupendra
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    Whattay brilliant question!

    The ‘Donald Duck as prior art’ case – The Danish inventor Karl Krøyer came up with a very creative solution: pump buoyant bodies into the ship to achieve sufficient upward lift to bring the ship back to the surface. The solution was so creative he got a patent on it. In a 1949 Donald Duck story, titled The Sunken Yacht a ship is raised by stuffing it full of ping-pong balls. That kind of prior art could kill the patent. But whether the story was actually used by a patent office to refuse the patent (application) remains unclear.


  26. Sandesh

    Karl Kroyer used idea from donald duck comics to bring AL Kuwait up to the surface.


  27. dineshk
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    Karl Krøyer raised the Al Kuwait off the shore of Kuwait by filling the ship with millions of inflatable balls stuffed down into the sunken ship. There is a story that this method of Krøyer was denied a patent because the same idea had already been used in a Donald Duck cartoon. Since there was prior art describing the technique, his invention wasn’t novel and hence not patentable.


  28. teju
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    Ship raising with expanded polystyrene (EPS) from Karl Kroyer. The patent application was rejected due to “prior art” – a 1949 Donald Duck story using the same technique


  29. donald dukc as prior art case


  30. The patent application for raising sunken vessels by using inflated balls (fig. 2) by the dude in the picture was rejected by the Dutch Patent Office since it was very similar to the idea proposed by Donald Duck(fig. 1)


  31. Dibyo
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    super question!

    so this is a case of BASF’s Karl Kroyer’s patent – of using polystyrene foam balls to float a sunken vessel in Kuwait harbour – being rejected because of ‘prior art’ – namely the Donald Duck strip Sunken Yacht shown above


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